How to be productive as a lazy freelancer: What successful freelancers say

It’s time to look at things differently. You can be a productive, successful, lazy freelancer or business owner! Whether you’re inclined to be lazy or your laziness stems from being too busy.

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Find your niche

All bloggers and entrepreneurs will tell you the same thing: find your passion. Because your passion, unlike boring things, will be the force driving you to continue.

Make sure your niche is the part of your industry that you enjoy the most. Then you’re sure to be more inclined to put as much into your business as possible. As opposed to feeling too lazy to do anything.

Mars Dorian, the king of lazy freelancing, states that having a niche is the key to making a success of being lazy. When you keep your focus narrow, you have a lot less to worry about, with less on your plate. All you have to focus on is getting really good at one thing.

Having strong skills in your niche also boosts confidence. And, according to Mars, confidence is the key to selling your lazy self to others.

Be committed

I must quote fellow writer Rebecca Livermore because she hit the nail right on the head. On Professional Content Creation, she discusses “Discipline that isn’t dependent on having time, but that is dependent on commitment.”

Sure enough, at one point I found myself doubting if I should continue my blog. Should I abandon my business? Should I let my website go?

Up until that point, I published at least one blog article each week, no problem. But my writing became inconsistent when my confidence wavered.

After all, how can you commit to a routine if you doubt the solidity of your commitment in the first place?

Don’t let the word “routine” scare you, by the way. If you’re naturally lazy, there’s an easier, more flexible way than nine-to-five-ing.

Work a little bit every day

Recently, I began a productivity experiment. For the past month, I have decreased my single-day workload by spreading my work hours over the week.

At first, I required two hours of work from myself on a daily basis, with the option to make up hours upon falling behind. My personal schedule made this difficult, though.

Sunday has since become my “makeup” day. It also doubles as a rest day, so I can prepare myself for the impending work week.

According to Idonsabi author onuohaadanma, working for only 2-3 hours each day can boost productivity. You may even increase the total amount of time that you spend working.

Sure enough, the results have been astonishing. To my relief, it’s much easier to commit to work for a set amount of time than to commit to completing a single task. Especially because, as freelancers or business owners, our work is never done. And we usually have projects of varying sizes on hand.

Until I began this new work routine, my biggest problem was commitment. I‘d look at my to-do list and seize up. Consistently, I did my best to get all little daily things done as soon as possible. The most intimidating tasks, however, would only get pushed to the next day or all eternity.

Which is not the type of procrastination I recommend.

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Productive procrastination

Shoaib Hussain of Freelance Apple believes in procrastination. Taking time to motivate yourself before buckling down to work can be time well spent.

This philosophy sure makes that morning cup of coffee the most essential part of your work day, doesn’t it?

I agree that there are two kinds of procrastination. Take care not to fall into the trap of the wasteful kind.

Rebecca is right: Bloggers fail either because they lack either time or ideas. (Or else don’t bother to put in the time or to work to find new ideas.)

In view of the latter problem, lacking inspiration, you could well to procrastinate a bit. To get the ideas flowing.

An earlier article of mind discusses how to find inspiration as a blogger. Among other things, I recommend watching a movie. This method works for different industries and different styles of writing.

For example, one restorative hobby that I’ve enjoyed for years is creative writing. My best novel was inspired by a TV show which, up until that point, I had thought was a terrible distraction. Watching season after season had seemed like such a waste of my precious time.

It’s worth mentioning that at the time I was pursuing my programming degree, so I had a huge pile of homework each day. Ironically, I wrote quite a bit during that time.

Between writing novels and watching TV, I was able to push through my final years of school. Because I not only found inspiration in my interests but also refreshment.

Which is what every lazy freelancer dreams of, right? To love what they do and live the life they love.

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